CFP: Bristol CMS Postgraduate Conference

IDENTITIES, COMMUNITIES AND ‘IMAGINED COMMUNITIES’
14-15 April 2023
POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE 2023

After the success of the 2022 ‘Transitions’ Conference, we invite you to the next instalment of the longest-standing medievalist PGR conference series. This year’s theme of Identities, Communities, and ‘Imagined Communities’ marks the 40-year anniversary of the publication of Benedict Anderson’s book on national identity. Observing all the uses medievalists have made of his theories in subsequent years, the conference celebrates the interdisciplinary currents that have benefitted academia in recent decades – Anderson, after all, did not initially believe his theories were suitable for the medieval world.


We welcome respondents and delegates to reflect on how we use concepts of identity and community
more broadly across medieval history. Society’s interest in its identities is arguably more topical today
than it was in 1983 when Imagined Communities was first published. How did medieval communities see
and perform their identities, how did this change over time, and why? What role did identities play – be they political, linguistic, or religious – in the consolidation of some communities and the subjugation of others?

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

• National Identities
• Religious Identities
• Sexuality and Gender Identities
• Ethnoreligious Communities
• Marcher Identities
• Urban Communities
• County Communities
• Frontiers, Conquest, and Expansion
• Law and Custom
• Migration and Xenophobia
• Ethnic Origins and Contemporary Myths
• Art and Architecture
• Seals and Heraldry
• Patronage and Memory
• Sovereignty
• Local Autonomy
• Archaeology
• Nationalism
• Concepts in History-writing

We welcome abstracts from postgraduates and early-career researchers, exploring all the aspects and
approaches to concepts of identity and communities, in all relevant disciplines pertaining to the medieval
period, broadly construed c.500-c.1500. Abstracts are 300 words for 20-minute papers. This year’s
conference will be a hybrid event online and on the campus of the University of Bristol.

Abstracts and enquiries: cms-conferenceenquiries@bristol.ac.uk
DEADLINE: 10 February 2023

CPF: Old Norse Poetry in Performance

Old Norse Poetry in Performance: Inheritance and Innovation Following its covid-induced hiatus, the third iteration of the triennial Old Norse Poetry in Performance conference will take place at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, on the 21st and 22nd of June 2023. Building on the successes of the conferences in 2016 and 2019 – which resulted in the recent publication of Old Norse Poetry in Performance (2022), a collection of essays edited by the previous organisers Brian McMahon and Annemari Ferreira – the intention of this conference remains, as before, to platform and develop the network of scholars and practitioners mutually interested in the poetic performance traditions of medieval Scandinavia.

With the theme ‘Inheritance and Innovation’, the 2023 programme aims to reflect even more completely the diversity in the performance traditions of the Old Norse source material, the scholarly traditions within the field, and the new, interdisciplinary perspectives being developed today. To this end, this conference will maintain the format of its previous iterations, showcasing academic research, practical performances, and the possibilities offered by combining the two.

The organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers and/or performances, which might cover, but need not be limited to, the following:

• Comparative approaches to eddic, skaldic, and rímur performances

• Legacies of performance traditions

• The ‘beyond-the-page’ approach to source texts

• The effects of translation on performance

• Legacies of scholarly traditions

• Interdisciplinary adaptations of Old Norse poems

Proposals should be no more than 300 words and should be sent to oldnorsepoetryinperformance@gmail.com, accompanied by a brief biographical note, by midnight on 17th February 2023.

For more information, please visit the conference website , or contact the organisers, Inés García López, Clare Mulley, Richard Munro, and Ben Chennells, at the email address given above.

CfP: Postgraduate Conference 2023 (University of Bristol): Identities, Communities and ‘Imagined Communities’

When: 14-15 April 2023

Abstracts and enquiries: cms-conference-enquiries@bristol.ac.uk
Deadline: 10 February 2023

After the success of the 2022 ‘Transitions’ Conference, we invite you to the next instalment of the longest-standing medievalist PGR conference series. This year’s theme of Identities, Communities, and ‘Imagined Communities’ marks the 40-year anniversary of the publication of Benedict Anderson’s book on national identity. Observing all the uses medievalists have made of his theories in subsequent years, the conference celebrates the interdisciplinary currents that have benefitted academia in recent decades – Anderson, after all, did not initially believe his theories were suitable for the medieval world. We welcome respondents and delegates to reflect on how we use concepts of identity and community more broadly across medieval history. Society’s interest in its identities is arguably more topical today than it was in 1983 when Imagined Communities was first published. How did medieval communities see and perform their identities, how did this change over time, and why? What role did identities play – be they political, linguistic, or religious – in the consolidation of some communities and the subjugation of others?

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
• National Identities
• Religious Identities
• Sexuality and Gender Identities
• Ethnoreligious Communities
• Marcher Identities
• Urban Communities
• County Communities
• Frontiers, Conquest, and Expansion
• Law and Custom
• Migration and Xenophobia
• Ethnic Origins and Contemporary Myths
• Art and Architecture
• Seals and Heraldry
• Patronage and Memory
• Sovereignty
• Local Autonomy
• Archaeology
• Nationalism
• Concepts in History-writing

We welcome abstracts from postgraduates and early-career researchers, exploring all the aspects and
approaches to concepts of identity and communities, in all relevant disciplines pertaining to the medieval
period, broadly construed c.500-c.1500. Abstracts are 300 words for 20-minute papers. This year’s
conference will be a hybrid event online and on the campus of the University of Bristol.

CfP: Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference 2023

The Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference committee are very excited to announce that the theme for the 2023 conference will be: ‘Names and Naming’

The conference will be held in person (with limited measures for online papers) at Ertegun House, Oxford, on the 20th and 21st of April, 2023. We are thrilled to announce this call for papers relating to all aspects of the broad topic of ‘names and naming’ in the medieval world. We are welcoming papers in any discipline, be it literary; historical; archaeological; linguistic; interdisciplinary; or anything else. There are no limitations on geographical region or time period, as long as the topic falls within the medieval period.

Examples of areas of interest may include but are not limited to:

♦ Naming and shaming
♦ Authorship; pseudonyms
♦ Classifications
♦ Etymology
♦ Place names
♦ Historiographical groups
♦ Ethnonyms
♦ Insults
♦ Nicknames
♦ Seals, identity
♦ Translation
♦ Trades
♦ Lineage
♦ Genres
♦ Graffiti; marginalia
♦ Saints’ names; cults

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES: Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes. We intend to provide bursaries to help with travel costs, and we are welcoming applications from graduate students at any university.

Please email abstracts of 250 words to oxgradconf@gmail.com by 15th January, 2023.

The text reads ' OMGC 2023. Save the Date! Online and in Oxford, 20th - 21st April, 2023 ', and is overlaid on a manuscript, a 15th century preist's vade medum, Bodleian Library MS. Douce 18, f. 44 v. This folio is the calendar page for April.

Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference 2023

SAVE THE DATE: The Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference will be back on April 20-21, 2023 with the theme of ‘Names and Naming’!

The conference will be fully hybrid, in Oxford and online. Keep your eyes peeled for a full Call for Papers in the coming weeks, and make sure you’re following us on Twitter @OxMedGradConf to be the first to see it!

In the meantime, check out the conference website (https://oxgradconf.wixsite.com/omgc), with its extensive digital collection of Oxford medieval medical manuscripts and its blog featuring some excellent articles on past conference themes. If you’d like to contribute a blog post or have any questions about the conference, you can get in touch at oxgradconf@gmail.com.

OMCN lectures now online

Trinity Term 2022 saw a lecture series at Christ Church on the medieval commentary tradition, organised by the Oxford Medieval Commentary Network. Video recordings of the lectures by Madalena Brito, Maria Czepiel, and Zachary Giuliano are now available to watch online, along with an extensive video archive of papers from last year’s OMCN workshop.

The CfP for the upcoming OMCN conference on 29 September is still open.

Early Text Cultures Workshop: Translating Cultures in Contact

Dear all,

The Early Text Cultures research network at the University of Oxford is pleased to announce the programme of the workshop Translating Cultures in Contact, which will conclude the seminar series on Textual Cultures in Contact. The event will take place online on Zoom, on Tuesday 5th July, from 9:00 to 16:00 BST (UK time). 

The event will explore dynamics of textual and cultural translation in Hellenistic Egypt, the medieval Latin, Greek and Arabic worlds, and Tibet and Mongolia. Please find the programme below; abstracts can be found on our website.

To receive the Zoom link for the event, please register here

9:00–9.10        Welcome and Opening Remarks

Domenico Giordani, UCL / University of Oxford

9:10–10:20       SESSION I: BYZANTINE TRANSLATIONS OF LATIN

CHAIR: Domenico Giordani, UCL / University of Oxford

1.  On the boundaries of philology and history of science: the Greek translation of the Semita Recta

Flavio Bevacqua, Università degli Studi di Padova

2. Translating Saint Jerome into Greek: the Life of Hilarion (BHL 3879)

Anna Lampadaridi, Paris, CNRS (UMR 5189 HiSoMA)

10:20–11:30     FIRST BREAK

11:30–12:30     SESSION II: HELLENISING ANCIENT EGYPT

CHAIR: Jordan Miller, University of Oxford

3.  Textual and Historical Observations on Inscribed Foundation Plaques of Hellenistic Egypt

Efstathia Dionysopoulou, Université de Lyon II

4. Untranslatability and the Case of Ptolemaic Priestly Decrees

Giulia Tonon, University of Liverpool

12:30–13:30     LUNCH BREAK

13:30–14:40     SESSION III: TRANSLATING FOUNDATIONAL FIGURES

CHAIR: Natasha Downs, University of Edinburgh

5.  Tibetan Buddhism and the Cult of Chinggis Khan

Dotno Pount, University of Pennsylvania

6. Greco-Arabic, Beyond Translation: Homer by the Rivers of Babylon

Teddy Fassberg, Tel Aviv University

14:40–15:00     THIRD BREAK

15:00–16:00     SESSION IV: FINAL ROUNDTABLE

CHAIR: Flaminia Pischedda, University of Oxford

If you have any questions, please get in touch with us by replying to this email. Please do feel free to forward this email to anyone who may be interested. 

We look forward to seeing you there! 

All best wishes, 
ETC Board 


Conference: ‘New Visions of Julian of Norwich’

15-16 July 2022, Somerville College & Online

in association with Oxford Medieval Studies, sponsored by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH)

Organisers: Antje Elisa Chan (Lincoln College, Oxford), Godelinde Gertrude Perk (Somerville, Oxford), Raphaela Rohrhofer (Somerville, Oxford), Alicia Smith (English Faculty, Oxford)

This international hybrid conference, held in Somerville College (Oxford) on 15th and 16th July, is the first academic event to focus solely on Julian’s writing, life, contexts, and influence long after her death. Offering thought-provoking panels and roundtables on a range of topics, from anchoritic transformations of the mundane to critical race studies, it maps out new and emerging dimensions in Julian scholarship.

The Somerville College choir will perform anthems based on Julian’s writing; a new play by writer-director Cindy Oswin, exploring the effect of age on the anchorite, will premiere at the conference. The opening lecture will be given by Professor Nicholas Watson (Harvard) with responses from Professor Laura Saetveit Miles (Bergen) and Professor Barry Windeatt (Cambridge). Professor Liz Herbert McAvoy (Swansea) will close the conference.

We particularly encourage graduate students and early-career researchers to attend; lower fees are offered for graduate students, unwaged and low-waged attendees.

To register: https://bit.ly/3vTAu5y 

More info: https://visionsofjulian.mml.ox.ac.uk/

Thursday 14th July

18:00-19:00 In-Person Welcoming Performance

New Music for a New Vision
by Dr. Alison Daniell (University of Southampton), Louise Stewart (Multitude of Voyces), and members of Somerville College Choir, dir. Will Dawes

Friday 15th July 

09:15 Opening session 

Keynote speaker – Nicholas Watson 

Julian of Norwich: Witness and Recension 

Respondents – Laura Saetveit Miles, Barry Windeatt 

11:30 Panel 1  

TRANSFIGURING THE MUNDANE 
Chair: Elizabeth Robertson 

Gillian Adler 
Julian of Norwich and Medieval Traversals of Time 

Raphaela Rohrhofer  
Julian of Norwich on Love and Nothingness  

Laura Kalas 
Producing Passioun: Reading Pain Generatively in the Revelations of Love
  

Jo Koster 
The Custom of Our Prayer: Establishing the Context of Julian’s Anchoritic Discourse 

14:00 Panel 2  

MATERIAL AND IMMATERIAL 
Chair: Annie Sutherland 

Fred Morgan 
“But I saw not synne” 

Anna-Nadine Pike 
“dereworthy blod”, Meditation and Performance in Julian of Norwich’s Revelations of Divine Love and British Library, MS Egerton 1821 

Melissa Tu 
“These words seyd our Lord”: Virtual Voices in Julian’s Text 
 

Victoria Yuskaitis 
Julian of Norwich’s Cell: The Role Archaeology Plays in Strengthening Authenticity and Impact 

16:00 Roundtable 1a  (at Pusey House)

CREATIVE ENGAGEMENTS WITH JULIAN 
Moderator: Antje E. Chan 

Max Brumberg-Kraus and Jennifer Awes-Freeman 
“Visions of Divine Love”: A Poetic and Visual Response to Julian’s Revelations 

Caroline Golum 
Creative Engagement with Revelations of Divine Love as Transcendental Cinema 

Laura Varnam 
Voices in Dialogue: Meeting Julian through Margery in Contemporary Creative Adaptations 

16:00 Roundtable 1b (at Pusey House)  

JULIAN IN THE COVID ERA 
Moderator: Hannah Lucas 

Gill Butterworth 
An Icon for Such a Time as This: A Pre-UK First Lockdown Anticipatory Consideration of Julian of Norwich and Pandemic Themes 

Margaret Healy-Varley 
Reading Julian for Resilience 

Richard Norton 
Julian of Norwich, The Church and Covid-19: A Scholarly and Pastoral Response  

17:30 Roundtable 2a   (at Pusey House)

PREMODERN CRITICAL RACE STUDIES AND JULIAN OF NORWICH 
Moderator: Mishtooni Bose  

A conversation between:  

Michelle M. Sauer 

Dorothy Kim 

Bailey Ludwig 

Kyle Moore 

17:30 Roundtable 2b (at Pusey House)

JULIAN AND MODERN CONTEMPLATIVE PRACTICES  
Moderator: Godelinde Gertrude Perk

Carla MacKinnon 
When a Woman Sits Alone: A Creative Project Inspired by Julian of Norwich 

Emma Pennington 
Doorway to Silence: An Analysis of the Use of Julian’s Text by Contemplative Prayer Groups Today 

Claire Foster-Gilbert 
Contemplating Cancer Cells: A Personal Account of Julian’s Companionship Enduring and Writing about Two and a Half Years of Treatment for Myeloma 

Saturday 16th July 

09:00 Panel 3 

MODERN RESPONSES TO JULIAN  
Chair: Alicia Smith 

Laura De Gaspari 
Divine Motherhood in Julian of Norwich and Spiritual Maternity in Edith Stein 

Heather Glover 
Beholding as Interpretive Strategy: Julian of Norwich’s Revelations of Divine Love and Christina Rossetti’s The Face of the Deep 

Simon Horobin 
“A dangerous book”: C.S. Lewis on the Revelations of Julian of Norwich 

Nancy Bradley Warren 
Julian of Norwich: New Visions of Her Lives and Afterlives 

11:00 Panel 4 

TEXTUAL INTERVENTIONS  
Chair: Laura Saetveit Miles 

Samira Lindstedt 
Towards a Grammar of Revelation: Editing and Translating Julian’s Revelations 

Fumiko Yoshikawa
What Do Scribal Corrections Show in Paris, BNF, Fonds Anglais MS 40? 

Brenna Duperron 
Editing Community in the Works of Julian of Norwich  

13:30 Panel 5 

BEYOND THE ANCHORHOLD 
Chair: Nicholas Watson 

Alexis Becker 
Behovely Work 

Laurence Bond 
“With alle the faith of haly kyrke”: Social Meaning and Dissent in the Writings of Julian of Norwich 

David Palko 
Moving Beyond Economics with Julian of Norwich 

Chase Padusniak 
Julian and the Politics of Norwich 

15:30 Panel 6 

WORKING ON / WITH JULIAN 
Chair: Ayoush Lazikani 

Juliana Dresvina  
Julian of Norwich’s Shewings: A Medieval Failure, An Early Modern Success 

Daniel Fishley 
The Weakness of A Revelation: Julian of Norwich, John Caputo, and the Questioning Event of Theology 

Hannah Lucas 
The Good Enough Mystic: Toward a Practical Theory of Julian Scholarship 

Melaney Poli 
How We got “Saint Julian”: A Short History in Images 

17:15 Respondent  

Liz Herbert McAvoy 

18:15-19:30 Play
A darkly humorous play written and performed by Cindy Oswin
‘Cell’ examines the enclosed life of Julian of Norwich into old age.

20:00-21:30 Closing Dinner

The 2022 Medium Ævum Annual Lecture

The Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature are pleased to announce the 2022 Medium Ævum Annual Lecture will be taking place on Saturday, 2 July (4:30-6pm BST):

Dr Ryan Perry (University of Kent) will deliver the annual lecture on ‘Middle English Books of Devotion and Liturgical Privatisation in Fifteenth-century England’, as part of the ‘Pfaff at 50’ conference at the University of Nottingham marking 50 years since the publication of Richard W. Pfaff’s ground-breaking New Liturgical Feasts in Later Medieval England

Dr Perry’s lecture will examine several devotional texts (such as pseudo-Bonaventure’s Meditationes vitae Christi and its English redaction by Nicholas Love) alongside manuscript assemblages to investigate how vernacular religious materials were put in service of individualised or household reading programmes. Such programmes might imitate the rhythms of the official liturgy or alternatively be understood in some respects as quasi-liturgies, reflecting improvised devotional regimens and structures of pious observance.

Registration details for in-person and online attendance are available at the following link: https://pfaff50.wordpress.com/keynote/

An illustration from a 12th century English manuscript of Terence's Eunuchus: the image depicts the soldier Thraso and his henchmen ready to besiege a house.

Corpus Christi Seminar and Conference on Terence, Eunuchus

A Double Act: Introductory Seminar and Research Conference
Corpus Christi College (Oxford), Trinity Term 2022

For info, programme, and registration form: http://www.apgrd.ox.ac.uk/events/2022/06/17/eunuchus#Programme

A hybrid weekly seminar in Trinity Term (Tuesdays 11.30am, 26 April to 14 June) and one-day research conference (Friday 17 June); in collaboration with the APGRD, Corpus Christi College Classics Centre, and the University of Leipzig. Organizers: Stefano Cianciosi (LMH, Oxford), Domenico Giordani (LMH, Oxford/UCL), Vincent Graf (Leipzig/Oxford), and Giuseppe Pezzini (CCC, Oxford).

Corpus Christi College Classics Centre and the APGRD are pleased to invite you to a double act dedicated to Terence’s most successful and most controversial comedy, Eunuchus, which will consist of a weekly introductory seminar and a one-day research conference, both open to everyone.

Introductory Seminar
Tuesdays 11.30-1pm, 26 April – 14 June
Corpus Christi College (Oxford) and on Zoom

Our programme encompasses a wide array of topics and perspectives on the play — from textual criticism to gender studies, from ancient and modern reception to stage-related issues and performance. In addition to presentations on selected passages given by graduate students and early career researchers, the first five sessions will include short introductions on several aspects of the text such as transmission, language, metre, Greek model, and the historical context of its performance.

We’d like to stress that the seminar is open to everyone and it is by no means expected that participants will have any prior knowledge of the Eunuchus or of Roman comedy in general. In fact, our aim is to bring different approaches to bear on the text and thus open up new avenues for interpretation.

Research conference: The Reception of Terence Eunuchus
Friday 17 June
Auditorium, Corpus Christi College (Oxford) and on Zoom

As Terence’s most successful play, Eunuchus was consistently part of the Latin school canon from the late Roman Republic to the modern era. Over a period of more than two thousand years, the comedy has been edited, performed, commented on, criticised, illustrated, and imitated numerous times. By bringing together experts on the ancient, medieval, and modern reception of the play, the workshop aims to discuss a wide range of approaches and provide insight into the colourful afterlife of one of Rome’s most successful poets.

Confirmed speakers:

Edith Hall (University of Durham)
Antony Augoustakis (University of Illinois, Urbana Campaign)
Andrew Cain (University of Colorado Boulder)
Vincent Graf (University of Oxford/Leipzig)
Giovanna Di Martino (University College London)
Andrea Peverelli (Leiden University)
Giulia Torello-Hill (University of New England)
Andrew Turner (University of Melbourne)
Beatrice Radden Keefe (Universitӓt Zürich)
Stefan Feddern (Universität Leipzig)  

Contact
If you have any questions or queries, please feel free to email Stefano Cianciosi at stefano.cianciosi@lmh.ox.ac.uk