Overview: Reading Groups (Trinity 2021)

Medieval Trade Reading Group

Meeting 7-8:30pm on Thursdays of even weeks of term.
Session 1: Thursday 6th May, Week 2
Session 2: Thursday 20th May, Week 4.
Session 3: Thursday 3rd June, Week 6.
Session 4: Thursday 17th June, Week 8.
We are an informal group who come together to discuss secondary readings about a variety of
themes related to medieval trade across the globe. In previous meetings we have discussed
readings covering topics such as Muslim merchant communities in China, Eastern Mediterranean
slavery, and network theory approaches. Each session, a group member will present for 5-10
minutes on a pre-suggested reading followed by a large group discussion. Suggested reading in
preparation for each session is sent out at least a week before the group meeting. Anyone
interested in any element of medieval trade and its study are welcome to join.
To be added to the team and have access to the materials and meetings please email Annabel
Hancock at annabel.hancock@history.ox.ac.uk

Medieval Latin Reading Group
Mondays, 13:00–14:00, Microsoft Teams
Improve your Latin, learn palaeographical skills, and engage first-hand with medieval texts by reading
reproductions of manuscripts together. We will learn to read and translate directly from medieval books,
moving in a roughly chronological sequence during the year.
All welcome; meetings will take place weekly during term. Submit your email address
(https://web.maillist.ox.ac.uk/ox/subscribe/medieval-latin-ms-reading) to receive notices.
Organisers: Jacob Currie; Andrew Dunning; Matthew Holford.

Pre-Modern Conversations

Fridays of even weeks, 11am–noon, Microsoft Teams
Convenors: Lena Vosding, Lewis Webb, Godelinde Perk

‘The Evangelist St. Matthew writing, with his symbol the angel’, MS 10 E 3, f. 18r (Museum Meermanno-Westreenianum, The Hague).


Nervous about an upcoming presentation? Struggling to improve your article’s argument or structure? In
need of constructive peer feedback on a book chapter, or simply encouragement? Join our friendly,
interdisciplinary group of early career pre-modernists, offering an informal, supportive environment for
helping each other revise, refine, and finally complete that work in progress.
The group convenes in weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8 on Teams to discuss a work in progress. The format for these
one-hour sessions alternates between a presentation to the entire group (for conference contributions) and a discussion of a pre-circulated written text. WIP contributors are expected to provide a cover letter outlining the desired areas for improvement to facilitate discussion. The final twenty minutes of each
meeting are dedicated to discussing more general topics related to writing, editing and publishing. All ECR pre-modernists from any Faculty are welcome. We particularly invite WIPs with an
interdisciplinary and/or gender focus. You are also very welcome to participate without contributing a
paper. If interested, please submit an abstract (up to 300 words) of your WIP, accompanied by a short biography
to lena.vosding@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk by Friday 30 April to be added to the PMC Teams channel and
receive updates on the programme as well as meeting invitations.
First meeting: week 2, Friday 7 May, 11am–noon, Teams.

Anglo-Norman Reading Group

The Anglo-Norman Reading Group will continue to meet on Zoom during Trinity Term on
Fridays of ODD weeks (30 April, 14, 28 May, and 11 June) from 5-6:30pm. We will be
reading the Anglo-Norman Fabliaux. Please contact Jane Bliss (jane.bliss@lmh.oxon.org) or
Stephanie Hathaway (stephanie.hathaway@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk).

Oxford University Numismatic Society
All talks will be held online over MS Teams at 5pm GMT. Links will be distributed beforehand by
means of the OUNS mailing list: to subscribe and receive meeting links and further updates,
please email the Secretary at daniel.etches@new.ox.ac.uk.

4th May (Week 2) at 5pm: Dr. John Talbot (University of Oxford): “Icenian and Durotrigan
Coinage – Using A Study of Coinage to Learn about Late Iron Age Society”
18th May (Week 4) at 5pm: Prof. Fleur Kemmers (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt): “Making Money
in Republican Rome: A Numismatic Perspective on Rome’s Expansion”.
1st June (Week 6) at 5pm: Dr. Maria Vrij (The Barber Institute of Fine Arts / University of
Birmingham): “‘How Do You Solve A Problem Like Mezezios?’ – Understanding and Unpicking the
Imagery of the Emperors Mezezios (668-669) and Constantine IV (668-685)”.
15th June (Week 8) at 5pm: Dr. Julien Olivier (Bibliothèque nationale de France): TBC.

Germanic Reading Group

This term we’re planning four meetings of the Germanic Reading Group, loosely connected by the theme
of alliterative verse. The sessions will take place on Mondays from 4:00 to 5:00 pm by Zoom, as follows:
Monday, 26 April (1st week). Old English, led by Rafael Pascual
Monday, 10 May (3rd week). Old High German, led by Howard Jones
Monday, 24 May (5th week). Old Norse, led by Eugenia Vorobeva
Monday, 7 June (7th week). Old Saxon, led by Nelson Goering
We’ll go through a short text, translating and discussing points of linguistic interest, under the guidance of
the leader of each session. To be added to the list, contact howard.Jones@sbs.ox.ac.uk

Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Tuesdays. Meeting from 5pm; papers begin at 5.15pm – on teams (click on this link to join)

Everyone is welcome at this informal and friendly graduate seminar. This Trinity Term, as always, MCC will feature presentations from the 2020-21 Medieval Studies MSt cohort on their upcoming dissertations.

Convenors: Sumner Braund (St John’s), Amy Ebrey (St John’s), IanMcDole (Keble), Lesley Smith (HMC)

Week 2 (4 May): Pilar Bertuzzi Rivett (Lincoln): Ten Names, One God: Exploring Christian-Kabbalistic affinity in a Christian hymn of the twelfth century
Samuel Heywood (St Peter’s): The Finnish Product: translation and transmission of Luther’s hymns in Finland and Sweden

Week 3 (11 May): Jennifer Coulton (Wolfson): Tongue-tied and Legal Loopholes: binding motifs in Early Medieval England
Florence Eccleston (Jesus): The Emotional and Embodied Experience of the Seven Deadly Sins, c.1350-c.1500

Week 4 (18 May): James Tomlinson (Magdalen): The Relationship between Music and Architecture in Late Medieval Creativity: structure, allegory, and memory
Irina Boeru (Wadham): At the frontier of the known world: cartographic and heraldic encounters inLibro del Conosçimiento de todos los Rregons et Tierras et Señorios que son por el mundo, et de las señales et armas que han

Week 5 (25 May): Arielle Jasiewicz-Gill (Oriel): Lay Devotion and Performative Identity in the Fifteenth Century
Florence Swan (Wolfson): The devel of helle sette his foot therin! A literary historical analysis of the cook in late medieval England

Week 6 (1 June): Thomas Henderson(Linacre): Twelfth-Century Mathematical Thinking: an anonymous fractions treatise, Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Auct. F.1.9

Museum in the Middle: medieval things in a (still) medieval university

OMS Trinity Term Lecture by Jim Harris (Ashmolean Museum)

Tuesday, 27 April 2021, 5-6pm BST, live streamed from the Ashmolean

The medieval collections of the Ashmolean Museum are rich in diversity and dazzling in quality, and using them in the service of the university curriculum has made it possible to explore the wide range of what we consider ‘medieval’ actually is.In this lecture, Teaching Curator Dr Jim Harris will discuss teaching with the Ashmolean’s medieval collections, asking questions not only about the objects themselves but about the extent to which they reveal the Museum itself to be as much a medieval construct as it is a so-called ‘product of the Enlightenment’.

Everybody welcome to join on youtube!
Image:  Travelling Games Board, Venice, 15th century; WA1964.14; Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford.


22nd / 23rd April: The Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference *Memory*

The Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference is taking place on Thursday and Friday this week!

To register; https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/memory-17th-oxford-medieval-graduate-conference-tickets-149951710603
To register; email: oxgradconf@gmail.com

OMGC Twitter Handle @OxMedGradConf #OMGC21

Sebastian Brant’s Ship of Fools in German and English Collections

On the 500th anniversary of the death of Sebastian Brant, this show-and-tell session brings together a multilingual array of his European bestseller, the Ship of Fools, live from the Bodleian Library, the British Library and the Staatsbibliothek Bamberg.

When? 10 May 2021, 3-4 pm

Where? Register for the Zoom session at tinyurl.com/NarrenschiffBodleian

For more information contact Henrike Lähnemann (henrike.laehnemann@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk)

Presenters:
Alexandra Franklin (Bodleian Library)
Susan Reed (British Library)
Bettina Wagner (StaatsbibliothekBamberg) Alyssa Steiner (Bamberg / Oxford
Henrike Lähnemann (Oxford)

Sebastian Brant: Narrenschiff. Basel: Johann Bergmann von Olpe, 12.II.1499.4° (GW 5047) Copy of the third edition of Sebastian Brant’s ‘Narrenschiff’London BL, IA.37957and Bamberg SB.

Sebastian Brant: Das neue Narrenschiff. Augsburg: Johann Schönsperger, 28.V.1498 (GW 5052)

Copy of an Augsburg reprint of the Strasburg interpolation of the Ship of Fools.Oxford Bod., Auct. 7Q 5.20

Sebastian Brant: Das Narrenschiff, Middle Low German. Lübeck [Mohnkopfdrucker (Hans van Ghetelen)], 1497. 4° (GW 5053) One of two extantcopies of the Middle Low German translation of the Ship of Fools.London BL, IA.9927

Sebastian Brant: Das Narrenschiff, Latin by Jacobus Locher Philomusus. Basel: Johann Bergmann von Olpe. 1.III.1497. 4° (GW5054) Copy of the edition princeps of the highly influential Latintranslation Oxford Bod., Douce 70

Sebastian Brant: Das Narrenschiff, Latin by Jacobus Locher Philomusus. With additions by Thomas Beccadelli. Basel: Johann Bergmann von Olpe, 1.VIII.1497.4°.Bamberg SB