Overview: Reading Groups (Trinity 2021)

Medieval Trade Reading Group

Meeting 7-8:30pm on Thursdays of even weeks of term.
Session 1: Thursday 6th May, Week 2
Session 2: Thursday 20th May, Week 4.
Session 3: Thursday 3rd June, Week 6.
Session 4: Thursday 17th June, Week 8.
We are an informal group who come together to discuss secondary readings about a variety of
themes related to medieval trade across the globe. In previous meetings we have discussed
readings covering topics such as Muslim merchant communities in China, Eastern Mediterranean
slavery, and network theory approaches. Each session, a group member will present for 5-10
minutes on a pre-suggested reading followed by a large group discussion. Suggested reading in
preparation for each session is sent out at least a week before the group meeting. Anyone
interested in any element of medieval trade and its study are welcome to join.
To be added to the team and have access to the materials and meetings please email Annabel
Hancock at annabel.hancock@history.ox.ac.uk

Medieval Latin Reading Group
Mondays, 13:00–14:00, Microsoft Teams
Improve your Latin, learn palaeographical skills, and engage first-hand with medieval texts by reading
reproductions of manuscripts together. We will learn to read and translate directly from medieval books,
moving in a roughly chronological sequence during the year.
All welcome; meetings will take place weekly during term. Submit your email address
(https://web.maillist.ox.ac.uk/ox/subscribe/medieval-latin-ms-reading) to receive notices.
Organisers: Jacob Currie; Andrew Dunning; Matthew Holford.

Pre-Modern Conversations

Fridays of even weeks, 11am–noon, Microsoft Teams
Convenors: Lena Vosding, Lewis Webb, Godelinde Perk

‘The Evangelist St. Matthew writing, with his symbol the angel’, MS 10 E 3, f. 18r (Museum Meermanno-Westreenianum, The Hague).


Nervous about an upcoming presentation? Struggling to improve your article’s argument or structure? In
need of constructive peer feedback on a book chapter, or simply encouragement? Join our friendly,
interdisciplinary group of early career pre-modernists, offering an informal, supportive environment for
helping each other revise, refine, and finally complete that work in progress.
The group convenes in weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8 on Teams to discuss a work in progress. The format for these
one-hour sessions alternates between a presentation to the entire group (for conference contributions) and a discussion of a pre-circulated written text. WIP contributors are expected to provide a cover letter outlining the desired areas for improvement to facilitate discussion. The final twenty minutes of each
meeting are dedicated to discussing more general topics related to writing, editing and publishing. All ECR pre-modernists from any Faculty are welcome. We particularly invite WIPs with an
interdisciplinary and/or gender focus. You are also very welcome to participate without contributing a
paper. If interested, please submit an abstract (up to 300 words) of your WIP, accompanied by a short biography
to lena.vosding@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk by Friday 30 April to be added to the PMC Teams channel and
receive updates on the programme as well as meeting invitations.
First meeting: week 2, Friday 7 May, 11am–noon, Teams.

Anglo-Norman Reading Group

The Anglo-Norman Reading Group will continue to meet on Zoom during Trinity Term on
Fridays of ODD weeks (30 April, 14, 28 May, and 11 June) from 5-6:30pm. We will be
reading the Anglo-Norman Fabliaux. Please contact Jane Bliss (jane.bliss@lmh.oxon.org) or
Stephanie Hathaway (stephanie.hathaway@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk).

Oxford University Numismatic Society
All talks will be held online over MS Teams at 5pm GMT. Links will be distributed beforehand by
means of the OUNS mailing list: to subscribe and receive meeting links and further updates,
please email the Secretary at daniel.etches@new.ox.ac.uk.

4th May (Week 2) at 5pm: Dr. John Talbot (University of Oxford): “Icenian and Durotrigan
Coinage – Using A Study of Coinage to Learn about Late Iron Age Society”
18th May (Week 4) at 5pm: Prof. Fleur Kemmers (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt): “Making Money
in Republican Rome: A Numismatic Perspective on Rome’s Expansion”.
1st June (Week 6) at 5pm: Dr. Maria Vrij (The Barber Institute of Fine Arts / University of
Birmingham): “‘How Do You Solve A Problem Like Mezezios?’ – Understanding and Unpicking the
Imagery of the Emperors Mezezios (668-669) and Constantine IV (668-685)”.
15th June (Week 8) at 5pm: Dr. Julien Olivier (Bibliothèque nationale de France): TBC.

Germanic Reading Group

This term we’re planning four meetings of the Germanic Reading Group, loosely connected by the theme
of alliterative verse. The sessions will take place on Mondays from 4:00 to 5:00 pm by Zoom, as follows:
Monday, 26 April (1st week). Old English, led by Rafael Pascual
Monday, 10 May (3rd week). Old High German, led by Howard Jones
Monday, 24 May (5th week). Old Norse, led by Eugenia Vorobeva
Monday, 7 June (7th week). Old Saxon, led by Nelson Goering
We’ll go through a short text, translating and discussing points of linguistic interest, under the guidance of
the leader of each session. To be added to the list, contact howard.Jones@sbs.ox.ac.uk

Interior of red-brick crypt chapel

Pilgrimage: A female perspective– Comparing Arnold von Harff and Dorothea von Montau

5th May 2021 will see the launch of the Taylor digital edition of MS Bodl. 972, a sixteenth-century copy of Arnold von Harff’s Reisebericht or travel account. This edition is the fruit of much hard work from Agnes Hilger and Eva Neufeind, who spent last term in Oxford as Erasmus interns with Henrike Lähnemann. In anticipation, we’ve put together a mini series of posts across various Oxford and Oxford-adjacent blogs. The first, which you can read on the Oxford Medieval Studies blog, was an introduction from Mary Boyle to Arnold von Harff and his literary context. The second, posted jointly on Teaching the Codex and Oxford’s History of the Book blog, was produced by Aysha Strachan, and gave us an insight into the manuscript’s journey to Oxford. The third post in the series comes from Josephine Bewerunge and Marlene Schilling, and it takes Arnold von Harff’s account as a starting point to explore the biography of a female pilgrim, Dorothea von Montau. Read on to find out more!

by Josephine Bewerunge & Marlene Schilling

When it comes to pilgrimage, the journey is most definitely the destination. This becomes very clear when looking at literary descriptions of religious travel: in the report of his three-year-long journey, Arnold von Harff describes his travels around Europe, Palestine and the Ottoman Empire between 1496 and 1499. The book features detailed descriptions of the culture, the people and the places he has visited, glossaries and alphabets of several different languages, drawings, and even an overview of the distance between each destination. In the end, Arnold gives a most crucial piece of advice to anyone who might want to follow in his footsteps: to take care of one’s belongings so they don’t get stolen on the way.

Painting in chapel of kneeling woman in dress and veil
Portrait of Dorothea von Montau

Arnold’s report reads like an adventure, suggesting that he strove for acclaim from his readership. Yet, the religious motivation for his travels can seem to fade into the background. So why not take a look at a different pilgrim whose journey was all about connecting with God, like Dorothea von Montau (1347-1394)? As a modest and pious woman, she did not have much in common with the self-consciously masculine aristocratic Arnold – except for the fact that her pilgrimages, too, have been written about: her life as a mystic and recluse is described in her biography, which includes several accounts of religious travel. In terms of perspective, aim and context, the writings about her life differ from Arnold’s travel report in every possible way. 

The differences actually begin with the texts’ purposes: while Arnold describes the things he has – allegedly –  seen with his own eyes during his travels, the vernacular biography, written by Dorothea’s confessor Johannes Marienwerder was intended to enhance her popularity among the local Teutonic Order community during her canonisation process, which was initiated shortly after her death in 1394. Although it claims to be based on Dorothea’s own accounts about her life which she shared with her confessor during her last years, one has to keep in mind that the text presents a literary construct of Dorothea’s life and of Dorothea herself, in the way a male theologian imagined an ideal pious woman.

Still, we can have something of a look at the female perspective on pilgrimage – as we’ve mentioned already, Dorothea was on the road quite a lot. Amongst other destinations, she travelled to Aachen, Rome and the Swiss Einsiedeln. A pilgrimage does not simply end at its main site though, and the way back might be just as difficult and testing. The distant third-person narrator describes Dorothea’s way back home from her pilgrimage to Einsiedeln as a very straining journey. She travels with both her senile husband and their young daughter. And just like a modern-day mum on vacation, she is the one holding it all together.

Landscape with town in foreground and mountains in background
Einsiedeln in Switzerland is still the destination of many
pilgrimages even today

While her journey is surely an adventure, it is very different from Arnold’s. Besides the challenging conditions of the journey (which are best described by the words God himself uses in the text: wassir, kot und sne  [water, faeces and snow]), Dorothea’s biggest struggle is looking after her family. She is the one who carries her husband’s luggage throughout their journey and who washes her family’s clothing at night, while also protecting their belongings from theft, since her husband is too frail to do that. Her hardships are underlined by the narrator’s frequent usage of the word field ‘suffering’ and the strong emphasis on Dorothea’s loneliness and tiredness throughout this episode:

des nachtis […] slief der man herte von mudikeit, und dy muste wachen, das sy icht vorlorn das ire und beschediget worden libes und gutes, alleyne sy ouch wol hette ru und slofes bedorft

at night her husband slept deeply because of his fatigue and she had to keep watch for them to not lose their possessions and to not be physically harmed, but she would have needed rest and sleep as well

Only God helps and protects her and raises her up when needed. This very strong connection between Dorothea and God is another difference from Arnold’s reports: while Arnold only asks God for his help during his travels, we actually see God’s help in action in Dorothea’s case. She considers him a spiritual groom, which draws a sharp contrast to her real-life husband, who is only adding to her distress. Ultimately, the way she bears her misery with the help of her steadfast trust in God is what actually makes her worthy to be a saint – the main point the biography intends to prove to the reader.

Dorothea’s central role as a strong woman among incapable men promotes an interesting gender dynamic. Transgressing the stereotypes of female passivity, she takes on the role of family protector – even saving her family’s life single-handedly. At one point during the journey, they have to cross a frozen lake and manage to travel with a horse-drawn sleigh. All of a sudden, a slight cracking noise indicates a catastrophe: the ice starts to break under the weight and the carriage falls through. Whilst the sleigh driver, his companion and her husband are startled and remain passive, Dorothea acts like a true hero. The narrator describes how she quickly grabs their luggage with one hand and her daughter with the other and jumps off the sleigh. Because her husband is – once again – unable to act in this situation of great danger, Dorothea has to come to his rescue. She grabs him by his feet and pulls him out of the water. This time, it is her daughter who points out divine intervention behind these events: she insists that it was in fact the Blessed Virgin Mary who saved her (because how else would you explain a woman so strong and resilient?).

Interior of red-brick crypt chapel
Dorothea’s last home: her cell in Marienwerder cathedral

Having heard about Dorothea’s journey, the travels of Arnold von Harff sound more like an adventurous holiday and what is more, he was clever enough to travel without dependents. Apart from the topic of pilgrimage, they do not seem to have much in common. However, the accounts share one major similarity: they are written to inspire. Dorothea’s endurance and faith are exemplary for anyone who wants to lead a godlier life. As for Arnold, his report can serve as a guidance for those who want to undertake a similar journey – or as an inspiration for those who want to imagine one – or even, maybe, for those who just want to pretend they did. After all, travelling, just like writing, is just a matter of perspective.

Bibliography

  • Toeppen, Max (Ed.): Das Leben der heiligen Dorothea von Johannes Marienwerder. Scriptores rerum Prussicarum. (Die Geschichtsquellen der preußischen Vorzeit). Vol. 2. Leipzig 1863, pp. 179–374.
  • Translation into English: Stargardt, Ute. The Life of Dorothea Von Montau, a Fourteenth-Century Recluse. Mellen, 1997.

Image Permissions

About the authors

Josephine Bewerunge and Marlene Schilling are both reading for the MSt in Modern Languages (German) at the University of Oxford in the academic year 2020/21. This blogpost is based on their joint presentation for the Medieval German Graduate Seminar in Hilary Term 2021.

 

Sixteenth-century pen and wash depiction of three figures representing Greek Christians

Arnold von Harff: Knight, Pilgrim, Guide, and Author

This post serves as a dual introduction, both to Arnold von Harff and to late-medieval pilgrimage writing more broadly. The latter goal in particular is, admittedly, rather brave.

Who was Arnold von Harff?

This is a question which Harff wants his audience to answer in a particular way. As he never tires of reminding us, he was a knight from an aristocratic family. To be more specific, he was the middle son of a nobleman, Adam von Harff. He was born around 1471 at the family seat of Schloss Harff in Bedburg, a castle which was demolished in 1972 for the sake of opencast brown coal mining, along with the whole associated settlement (to see full-size versions of any images, click through twice).

As you can see, pretty much nothing survived, but the Crucifixion group which had been in the churchyard since 1531 was moved to the new settlement and affixed to the modern church wall. It bears some striking similarities to the Crucifixion image transmitted with Harff’s Reisebericht, the earliest version of which is roughly thirty years older than the group (though note that this version of the image, as transmitted in MS Bodl. 972, post-dates the statues by about twenty years).

Harff set out from Cologne at the age of twenty-five on a rather ambitious programme of pilgrimage: he apparently planned as highlights Rome, Sinai, Jerusalem, Santiago de Compostela, St Patrick’s Purgatory on Lough Derg, and Wilsnack. He did reach the first four of these destinations. He also, apparently, made it to many further-flung locations, some of them evidently only by travelling on the page. As previous generations of scholars have observed, a fair amount is clearly carried over from other sources including, but not limited to, Marco Polo, Odoric of Pordenone, Ptolemy’s Geography, and – perhaps most significantly – John Mandeville’s Book, also known as Mandeville’s Travels. In any case, Harff didn’t make it to Wilsnack or Ireland. He returned home in 1499. In 1504, he married Margarethe von dem Bongart and followed his uncle in the post of hereditary chamberlain at the court of Guelders. His story has a rather sad ending: he died only a year later, in 1505, leaving his wife pregnant. Their daughter died too, in early childhood, and was buried with him. But his writing has survived, and was fairly popular amongst members of his own social class in the Rhineland and Westphalia. It continued to be circulated in manuscript into the seventeenth century, though it was not printed until 1860. It was then edited by Eberhard von Groote, using three manuscripts in the Harff family archives, including one that, while unlikely to be an autograph, dates from shortly after Harff’s journey.

What is late-medieval pilgrimage writing?

So let’s now turn to the Reisebericht’s literary context. The first thing to do here is to separate the practice of actually going on a journey from the accounts of travel that we find on the page, even if they are written by people who really have travelled. It’s a constant refrain today that the lives people recount on social media are not identical with the lives they’re actually living: social media offers us the curated version, often carefully groomed to leave certain details out or to foreground others. It’s – usually – a version of reality, based, at least to an extent, in what has actually happened, but it doesn’t quite overlap. I don’t simply mean this in the sense that recounting exactly what happened at every moment of every day would be both tedious and impossible, or even particularly that people’s memories are flawed and subjective, though of course that’s true. It’s the gap between the picture of a historic landmark apparently on its own, while in reality, locals waited impatiently behind the photographer, who was carefully adjusting the angle to avoid the crane behind it and the modern building in front of it. A fifteenth-century pilgrimage on the page and a fifteenth-century pilgrimage as it really happened are deliberately and consciously different, and when we read pilgrimage writing, we’re looking at journeys on the page. Despite the huge range of texts which come under the heading of ‘pilgrimage writing’, and the scope for variation beyond descriptions of the pilgrimage site themselves, there are conventions which, certainly by the time Arnold von Harff was travelling and writing, are quite rigid when it comes to recounting visits to the Holy Places in Jerusalem.

So let’s focus in on Jerusalem. One of the key factors behind this conformity was the Franciscan Order, who had been granted the Custody of the Holy Land in 1342 by Pope Clement VI. The pilgrimage programme the Franciscans developed endured with little variation for two centuries. The sites to be visited, the liturgy at each, the order in which they were seen, the route between them, and the terms in which they were described, were shared by late-medieval western pilgrims making the Jerusalem pilgrimage (though parts of the route could be taken in reverse). But the Franciscans weren’t content for their programme to remain in Jerusalem. Pilgrims brought it back with them in their accounts, and the pilgrimage was so formalised that pilgrim authors frequently copied one another’s words, and the advent of print in the second half of the fifteenth century really speeded up this process.

Although Harff’s account wasn’t itself printed, he made use of printed accounts in his writing process, including the Peregrinatio in terram sanctam of one of the Big Names of German pilgrimage writing: Bernhard von Breydenbach. We can see traces of this rather mammoth work in text and image in Harff’s account. His section on Greek Christians is a key example, and several alphabets are also lifted from Breydenbach. Nonetheless, most of the images transmitted with Harff’s Reisebericht cannot be traced to Breydenbach.

Another crucial source for Harff (and for many others), and almost certainly another printed one, is John Mandeville’s Book. This is purportedly the first-person description of an English knight’s pilgrimage to the Holy Land and his further travels in the East. It appeared in French in the second half of the fourteenth century, was transmitted widely in manuscript, and rapidly translated into various vernaculars including, by 1415, two separate German translations, those of Otto von Diemeringen and Michael Velser. Both were printed in 1480. Mandeville’s depiction of the Holy Land was enormously influential – despite the fact that it was also long out of date by the time of its first appearance, being largely dependent on crusader-era sources, and without reference to the Franciscan pilgrimage.

The point was not – usually – to use Mandeville as a source for information about the reality of fifteenth-century Jerusalem, since, as we’ve seen, this wasn’t the point of pilgrimage writing in general. Mandeville’s version of Jerusalem was already multi-era and multi-source, so mingling it with later pilgrim experiences means that the late-medieval Jerusalem-on-the-page becomes what Anthony Bale calls ‘the perfect simulacrum, a copy whose original had long since vanished, if it had ever existed’. So while there’s of course a certain overlap between Jerusalem-on-the-page and Jerusalem-in-the-world, the former was what pilgrims were aiming to describe when they copied from or drew on Mandeville’s description of Jerusalem, whether they did it with Mandeville as their direct source or whether they were copying other pilgrims who had themselves drawn on Mandeville. Bale coins the term ‘meme Jerusalem’ to describe this phenomenon.

But outside the ‘meme Jerusalem’ and beyond the Holy Land? Well, I started out by saying that it was rather brave to attempt an introduction to late-medieval pilgrimage writing, and that’s because it’s quite … elastic as a category. As Harff’s Reisebericht shows us, there was scope for pretty much whatever you wanted to include when you sat down to write about your pilgrimage. And while Harff might start his account by describing himself as ‘ritter geboren’ [knight by birth], he finishes it by asking his audience to pray for the pylgrym, weech wijser, ind dichter [pilgrim, guide, and author]. Just as he can be many things at once, so can his Reisebericht – and so can anyone else’s.

Image Permissions

  • Digital.Bodleian (images from MS Bodl. 972 and Arch. B c.25): Creative Commons non-commercial license, with attribution (CC-BY-NC 4.0). Images © Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford.
  • Wikimedia Commons (Crucifixion group from Morken-Harff):  Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License (CC BY-SA 3.0). Photo: Heinz Rade.
  • Wikimedia Commons (Schloss Harff): Public Domain from the collection of Ludger Allhoff.
  • Wikimedia Commons (Tagebau-Garzweiler): Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Germany License (CC-BY-SA-3.0). Photo: Arne Müseler.

About the author

Mary Boyle is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in Oxford’s Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and a Junior Research Fellow at Linacre College, Oxford. She is the author of Writing the Jerusalem Pilgrimage in the Late Middle Ages (DS Brewer, 2021).

The digital edition of MS Bodl. 972 will be launched on 5th May 2021.

Medieval Church and Culture Seminar

Tuesdays. Meeting from 5pm; papers begin at 5.15pm – on teams (click on this link to join)

Everyone is welcome at this informal and friendly graduate seminar. This Trinity Term, as always, MCC will feature presentations from the 2020-21 Medieval Studies MSt cohort on their upcoming dissertations.

Convenors: Sumner Braund (St John’s), Amy Ebrey (St John’s), IanMcDole (Keble), Lesley Smith (HMC)

Week 2 (4 May): Pilar Bertuzzi Rivett (Lincoln): Ten Names, One God: Exploring Christian-Kabbalistic affinity in a Christian hymn of the twelfth century
Samuel Heywood (St Peter’s): The Finnish Product: translation and transmission of Luther’s hymns in Finland and Sweden

Week 3 (11 May): Jennifer Coulton (Wolfson): Tongue-tied and Legal Loopholes: binding motifs in Early Medieval England
Florence Eccleston (Jesus): The Emotional and Embodied Experience of the Seven Deadly Sins, c.1350-c.1500

Week 4 (18 May): James Tomlinson (Magdalen): The Relationship between Music and Architecture in Late Medieval Creativity: structure, allegory, and memory
Irina Boeru (Wadham): At the frontier of the known world: cartographic and heraldic encounters inLibro del Conosçimiento de todos los Rregons et Tierras et Señorios que son por el mundo, et de las señales et armas que han

Week 5 (25 May): Arielle Jasiewicz-Gill (Oriel): Lay Devotion and Performative Identity in the Fifteenth Century
Florence Swan (Wolfson): The devel of helle sette his foot therin! A literary historical analysis of the cook in late medieval England

Week 6 (1 June): Thomas Henderson(Linacre): Twelfth-Century Mathematical Thinking: an anonymous fractions treatise, Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Auct. F.1.9

(Tuesdays, 5:30pm): London Society for Medieval Studies Seminar

Tuesdays, 17:30, via Zoom

– 11/05: Reyhan Durmaz (University of Pennsylvania), “Family, Fame, and Faith: The Making of Christian Communities in Medieval Northern Mesopotamia”.

– 18/05: Richard G. Newhauser (Arizona State University), “Sensology and Enargeia”.

– 08/06: Philip Booth (Manchester Metropolitan University), “An Almost Incredible Multitude: Mass Pilgrimage to the Holy Land in the 11th Century”.

– 29/06: Alberto Luongo (Università per Stranieri di Siena), “The legend of Saint Francis and the wolf of Gubbio: new perspectives from a forthcoming book”.

Zoom links: https://www.history.ac.uk/seminars/london-society-medieval-studies?fbclid=IwAR2uZYdTvj9WucrjFbc_Wbg8Ep4-smtIcHH632iMqzgh5jriZmcSveu0a8Q.


About the seminar: Founded in 1970/1, the London Society for Medieval Studies seeks to foster knowledge of, and dialogue about, the Middle Ages (c.500–c.1500 CE) among both scholars and the wider public in London. Organised by postgraduates and early career academics, our fortnightly seminars showcase the latest advances in all areas of medieval studies, including history, art, politics, economics, literature and archaeology. All are welcome.

Pre-Modern Conversations: Introducing our WIP Group

The Evangelist St. Matthew writing, with his symbol the angel.
‘The Evangelist St. Matthew writing, with his symbol the angel’, Book of Hours from the southern Low Countries (f. 18r; detail). Early sixteenth century. Now in Museum Meermanno-Westreenianum, The Hague, RMWW MS 10 E 3. Image: Museum Meermanno-Westreenianum & Koninklijke Bibliotheek, Den Haag. Source: manuscripts.kb.nl; https://manuscripts.kb.nl/show/manuscript/10+E+3; CC0 1.0)

Introduction
On a chilly Autumn day, two postdoctoral fellows (Lena Vosding and Godelinde Gertrude Perk) were conversing in their shared office. They were very fond of their group of fellow supervisees, its camaraderie, and the support it provided. Nevertheless, the two early-career researchers still struggled on occasion to improve the argument of the articles they were working on and wanted additional peer feedback and an additional space for sharing ideas. “How about we start a WIP (work in progress) group ourselves?” A pen was seized from a nearby desk, and, after a little brainstorming and scribbling on a scrap of paper, the first outline for Pre-Modern Conversations emerged. Joined shortly thereafter by Lewis Webb from Classics, the duumvirate of convenors became a triumvirate, who quickly submitted a description to the OMS booklet.

What is Pre-Modern Conversations?
Pre-Modern Conversations is an interdisciplinary group of early-career pre-modernists, offering an informal, supportive environment for helping each other revise, refine, and complete a work in progress. In the past, we’ve found that whether one works on medieval religion or Republican Rome, one tends to encounter similar theoretical and methodological questions. What is more, the challenges one encounters when writing or revising tend to be similar across fields. We, therefore, defined “pre-modern” very broadly and included any period up to 1800. Since the convenors’ research shared a focus on pre-modern gender, we were particularly interested in hearing from other scholars with a similar or adjacent focus. We had initially decided that the format for the one-hour session would alternate between a presentation to the entire group (for conference contributions) and a discussion of a pre-circulated written text. For Hilary Term, however, the WIPs submitted were mostly written texts, which we discussed in detail, focusing mostly on content and argument.

Tondo of woman with wax tablets and stylus (so-called “Sappho”).
Tondo of woman with wax tablets and stylus (so-called “Sappho”), VI.Ins.Occ., Pompeii. First century CE. Now in National Archaeological Museum of Naples (inv. no. 9084). (Image: Wikimedia Commons; CC BY-SA 2.0)

Experiences so far
To our delight, the four available slots filled up very quickly. Both medievalists and Classicists joined the group, which led to lively interdisciplinary synergy. Topics varied widely, from Roman law and urban space in Asia Minor in the late Antique period through medieval recluses to early-modern refugees and twentieth-century poets, yet similar themes emerged. We also decided to spend the last twenty minutes discussing more general concerns, for instance writing grant applications, and sharing our experiences as ECRs. The phase following one’s DPhil or PhD can potentially feel stressful, precarious, and directionless, and many ECRs feel lost at sea, a problem our friends in the ECR Network of Medieval and Modern Languages also seek to alleviate. A forum for sharing ideas, knowledge, experiences and alternative perspectives can help ECRs find their bearings and navigate this uncertain stage of their career.

Plans for next term
We’re thrilled to continue in Trinity Term! We will again convene in weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8 on TEAMS. The programme looks very promising already, but there are still slots left. Interested in joining? Send an abstract (up to 300 words) of your WIP, accompanied by a short biography to lena.vosdingATmod-langs.ox.ac.uk by Friday 30 April. You are also very welcome to participate without contributing a paper.

Study of a woman's right hand (said to be that of Artemesia Gentileschi) holding a brush’.
‘Study of a woman’s right hand (said to be that of Artemesia Gentileschi) holding a brush’, by Pierre Dumonstier II. 1625. Now in London, British Museum (Museum no. NN,7.51.3). (Image: British Museum. © The Trustees of the British Museum; CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.)

Museum in the Middle: medieval things in a (still) medieval university

OMS Trinity Term Lecture by Jim Harris (Ashmolean Museum)

Tuesday, 27 April 2021, 5-6pm BST, live streamed from the Ashmolean

The medieval collections of the Ashmolean Museum are rich in diversity and dazzling in quality, and using them in the service of the university curriculum has made it possible to explore the wide range of what we consider ‘medieval’ actually is.In this lecture, Teaching Curator Dr Jim Harris will discuss teaching with the Ashmolean’s medieval collections, asking questions not only about the objects themselves but about the extent to which they reveal the Museum itself to be as much a medieval construct as it is a so-called ‘product of the Enlightenment’.

Everybody welcome to join on youtube!
Image:  Travelling Games Board, Venice, 15th century; WA1964.14; Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford.


22nd / 23rd April: The Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference *Memory*

The Oxford Medieval Graduate Conference is taking place on Thursday and Friday this week!

To register; https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/memory-17th-oxford-medieval-graduate-conference-tickets-149951710603
To register; email: oxgradconf@gmail.com

OMGC Twitter Handle @OxMedGradConf #OMGC21

‘Digital Editions Live’ – Workshop 25 June 2021, 3-5pm (tbc)

Methodology Workshop in cooperation with OCTET and Dark Archives

  • Insights from the Series of ‘Digital Editions Live’ launches  
  • Developing a framework for digital editing and exploring manuscripts online   
  • Reflections on preparing digital editions in times of lockdown  
  • Development of new digital methods for teaching History of the Book 
  • Further Perspectives in conjunction with the Oxford Centre for Textual Editing and Theory and initiatives at Trinity College Dublin 

In line with the previous Dark Archives conferences, the presentations (in this case: the digital edition launch events) will be accessible via http://darkarchiv.es. They will be linked in to the Taylor Editions https://editions.mml.ox.ac.uk/ and archived via OCTET https://octet.web.ox.ac.uk/

At four thematic panels, the graduate students will discuss with international guests and Oxford-based editors from OCTET and Digital Humanities methodological issues arising from the digital launches and the digital public engagement they undertook for their projects.  

3:00pm – Expanding Unicode: Challenges of non-standardised features (A) 

3:30pm – Expanding Taylor Editions: Making advanced use of the platform’s functionalities (B) 

4:00pm – Expanding Versions: Challenges of linking up with existing editions and translations (C) 

4:30pm – Expanding Access: Challenges of Digital Public Engagement (D) 

6pm – Open Air Drinks for Oxford participants in St Edmund Hall  

Panelists for A (abbreviations / unicode / encoding damage): 

  • Katie Bastiman and Holly Abrahamson: Dante Ante-Purgatorio (MS. Canon.Ital. 108) 
  • Josephine Bewerunge, Molly Ford, Sam Heywood, Caroline Lehnert, Molly Lewis, Marlene Schilling: A collective edition of a German devotional miscellany (MS. Germ. e. 5) [or split the group across different panels] 

Panelists for B (Taylor editions): 

  • Eva Neufeind and Agnes Hilger: Arnold von Harff (MS. Bodley 972)  
  • Alexandra Hertlein & Dennis Pulina: Jacob Locher Panegyricus (Inc. e. G7.1497.2./Douce 73) 
  • Edmund Wareham and Alyssa Steiner: Reformation Pamphlets 
  • Sam Griffiths and Christian Tofte: Marginalia in Plutarch’s Vidas Paralelas (1491)  

Panelists for C (other editions): 

  • Sebastian Dows-Miller: Re-awakening Merton’s Beasts (Merton College, MS. 249)  
  • Gabriel O’Regan: Le Roman de Renart (Bodleian Library, MS. Douce 360) 
  • Javaria Abbasi: Pedro de Medina’s Libro de cosmographia (1538), (MS. Canon. Ital. 243) 
  • Giuseppe Nanfitò: Boccaccio, Filocolo (MS. Canon. Ital. 85) 

Panelists for D (digital engagement): 

  • Mary Newman: The oldest Tupi manuscript (MS. Bodley 617) 
  • Lois Williams: Cân o Senn iw Hên Feistr TOBACCO (1718), NLW. North PRINT W.s. 156 
  • Danielle Apodaca: Le Roman de Flamenca DH project across editions and translations 
  • Carrie Heusinkveld: Reconsidering the Metamorphoses by Clément Marot (MS. Douce 117) 

Digital Editions Live: Launching the Oxford History of the Book Projects 2021

Taylor Editions and the Centre for the Study of the Book present: Digital Editions Live – Launching the Oxford History of the Book Projects 2021  

The series presents projects which have been developed by Master students in the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages as part of their ‘Method Option’ Palaeography, History of the Book, Digital Humanities, https://historyofthebook.mml.ox.ac.uk/.  

Launches will feature new digital editions on https://editions.mml.ox.ac.uk/, the Taylor Editions website, and a live showing of manuscripts and books. The sessions take place every Wednesday during the Oxford Trinity Term, 28 April to 16 June 2021. Everybody is welcome to attend the sessions which will be held via Teams and recorded. Join the meeting here
After term, there will be a workshop in conjunction with Dark Archives to reflect on the methodology of editing, presenting – and teaching History of the Book on 25 June.  
For further information, contact Henrike Lähnemann <henrike.laehnemann@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk> 

1) 28 April 2021 Introduction and Animals in French Manuscripts 

  • Henrike Lähnemann, Emma Huber, Andrew Dunning: Introduction to Digital Editions Live 
  • Sebastian Dows-Miller: Re-awakening Merton’s Beasts (Merton College, MS. 249)  

2) 5 May 2021 Travelling Manuscript 

  • Eva Neufeind, Agnes Hilger, Mary Boyle, and Aysha Strachan: Arnold von Harff (MS. Bodley 972)  

3) 12 May 2021 Early Printed Holdings in Taylorian and Bodleian 

  • Agnes Hilger and Alyssa Steiner: Pfaffennarr (Taylor ARCH.8o.G.1521(27) & Tr.Luth. 16 (78)) 
  • Alexandra Hertlein & Dennis Pulina: Jacob Locher Panegyricus (Inc. e. G7.1497.2./Douce 73) 
  • Sam Griffiths and Christian Tofte: Marginalia in Plutarch’s Vidas Paralelas (1491) 

4) 19 May 2021 Indigenous Languages: Tupi and Welsh 

  • Mary Newman: The oldest Tupi manuscript (MS. Bodley 617) 
  • Lois Williams: Cân o Senn iw Hên Feistr TOBACCO (1718), NLW. North PRINT W.s. 156 

5) 26 May 2021 Illustrated Italian Manuscripts  

  • Katie Bastiman and Holly Abrahamson: Dante Ante-Purgatorio (MS. Canon.Ital. 108) 
  • Giuseppe Nanfitò: Boccaccio, Filocolo (MS. Canon. Ital. 85) 

6) 2 June 2021 Collective Editing and Linked Data 

  • Josephine Bewerunge, Molly Ford, Sam Heywood, Caroline Lehnert, Molly Lewis, Marlene Schilling: A collective edition of a German devotional miscellany (MS. Germ. e. 5)  
  • Danielle Apodaca: Le Roman de Flamenca DH project across editions and translations 

7) 9 June 2021 Illuminated French Manuscript 

  • Carrie Heusinkveld: Reconsidering the Metamorphoses by Clément Marot (MS. Douce 117) 
  • Javaria Abbasi: Pedro de Medina’s Libro de cosmographia (1538), (MS. Canon. Ital. 243) 

8) 16 June 2021 Special Book Launch: 500 Years Passional Christi und Antichristi  

  • Edmund Wareham presents the newest book in the Reformation Pamphlet series